Where to look for Ubuntu Resources

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The Ubuntu community has a vast pool of knowledge you can draw from in the form of online resources. The following is a list of links to some of the most popular and useful venues.

• http://ubuntuforums.org — In this searchable web forum and moderated social network is a diverse, talented, and moderated community of Ubuntu users and support staff. Here people share their success and setbacks with each other as well as offering assistance and guidance. Chances are good that if you’re having difficulty with something in Ubuntu, someone has already run into the same problem and found a solution.

• www.ubuntu.com/support — This site offers paid support from Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu. If you don’t want to spend time searching through the forums, or waiting for responses, Canonical Ltd. is one avenue for telephone, e-mail, and web support costing around $20 a month. There is also Ubuntu training available aimed at companies and corporate users.

• https://help.ubuntu.com — This site contains the official, up-to-date, online documentation for each Ubuntu release. As newer Ubuntu releases come out, you can come here to find out what’s new.

• http://screencasts.ubuntu.com — View recorded desktop sessions on how to do different things with Ubuntu, from setting up a printer, to setting up Samba file sharing, to installing updates to keep your Ubuntu system in top shape. Ubuntu users are encouraged to join the Ubuntu Screencasts Launchpad Team (https:// launchpad.net/~ubuntu-screencasts) to contribute.

• https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users — Join the Ubuntu-users mailing list and interact with Ubuntu users over e-mail to discuss and solve problems that come up with everything from implementing mysql databases to setting up a problematic network devices. An archive of past threads can be viewed at https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-users.

• https://wiki.ubuntu.com/IRCResourcePage — If you are interested in live IRC chat support, you can visit the Ubuntu IRC resource page to find guidelines, clients, and chat servers which are an available source of support, free at any time. It is advisable to visit the Ubuntu Code of Conduct page (www.ubuntulinux.org/community/conduct/) if you have not taken part in IRC chat before.


If you plan on buying hardware to use with your Ubuntu or other Linux system, these sites may be helpful in determining where to spend your money:

• www.linux-usb.org — This web site aims to maintain a working knowledge of USB devices known to be Linux-friendly. There is a search utility where you can plug in the name or model of a manufacturer and get an instant status report on the usability of that device with Linux.

• www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting—The CUPS (http://cups.org) printing system is the standard printing system used on most Linux systems these days. If your printer model is not listed when you attempt to add a new printer to your Ubuntu system, you may need to search this site for an updated PPD file to add to your CUPS system. Vendors who make Linux-friendly printers can also be found at www.linux-foundation.org/en/OpenPrinting/Database/SuggestedPrinters.

• www.sane-project.org — Scanner Access Now Easy (SANE) is a site devoted to the topic of document scanning on Linux. If you are looking for a scanner or multifunction printer, check here to see how well the vendors stack up in terms of Linux support.

• http://tldp.org—The Linux Documentation Project is a culmination of Guides, How-To articles, and FAQS covering everything from how to make coffee with Linux to setting up QoS and Traffic Control.

Certainly this is not a complete list, but these are good places to look first. You can also try searching for Linux-related support on a hardware vendor’s web site prior to making your purchase. If they intend their hardware to work with Linux, they may have drivers or instructions available. And don’t forget the wealth of information you can find by searching for Linux on your favorite search engine.

Lastly, look for a local Linux User’s Group (LUG) in your area. A LUG is a local community of people keenly interested in Linux and its implementations. You will find people with a wide range of experience, from system administrators to casual Linux users, to distro maintainers, to CEOs of companies. LUGs generally meet on a regular basis for group discussions and hold presentations to demonstrate ways they’ve found to implement Linux and other related technology.

Some LUGs sponsor local events like install fests (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Install_fest) or other Linux advocacy–type events. Chances are good that if you ask a question at a LUG meeting, someone (but more likely several) will have an answer. A search engine should help you locate a LUG in your area if you decide to pursue this. Most LUGs have web sites or mailing lists that can be easily found online.

Source of Information : Wiley Ubuntu Linux Toolbox 1000 plus Commands for Ubuntu and Debian Power Users

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