Windows 7 File Management: The Library System

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Compared to the Taskbar and the System Tray, Explorer hasn’t changed much in Windows 7. However, its left pane does sport two new ways to get at your files: Libraries and HomeGroups. Libraries could just as appropriately have been called File Cabinets, since they let you collect related folders in one place. By default, you get Libraries labeled Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos, each of which initially directs you to the OS’s standard folders for storing the named items—such as My Pictures and Public Pictures. To benefit from Libraries, you have to customize them. Right-click any folder on your hard drive, and you can add it to any Library; for instance, you can transform the Pictures Library into a collection of all your folders that contain photos. You can create additional Libraries of your own from scratch, such as one that bundles up all folders that relate to your vacation plans. Libraries would be even more useful if Microsoft had integrated them with Saved Searches, the Windows feature (introduced in Vista) that lets you create virtual folders based on searches, such as one that tracks down every .jpg image file on your system. But while Windows 7 lets you add standard folders to a Library, it doesn’t support Saved Searches.


HOMEGROUPS, SWEET HOMEGROUPS?
Closely related to Libraries are HomeGroups, a new feature designed to simplify the notoriously tricky process of networking Windows PCs. Machines that are part of one HomeGroup can selectively grant each other read or read/write access to their Libraries and to the folders they contain, so you can perform such mundane but important tasks as providing your spouse with access to a folderful of tax documents on your computer. HomeGroups can also stream media, enabling you to pipe music or a movie off the desktop in the den onto your notebook in the living room. And they let you share a printer connected to one PC with all the other computers in the HomeGroup, a useful feature if you can’t connect the printer directly to the network. HomeGroups aren’t a bad idea, but Windows 7’s implementation seems half-baked. HomeGroups are password-protected, but rather than inviting you to specify a password of your choice during initial setup, Windows assigns you one consisting of ten characters of alphanumeric gibberish and instructs you to write it down so you won’t forget it. To be fair, passwords made up of random characters provide excellent security, and the only time you need the password is when you first connect a new PC to a HomeGroup. But it’s still a tad peculiar that you can’t specify a password you’ll remember during setup— you can do that only aft er the fact, in a diff erent part of the OS. More annoying and limiting: HomeGroups won’t work unless all of the PCs in question are running Windows 7, a scenario that won’t be typical anytime soon. A version that also worked on XP, Vista, and Mac systems would have been cooler. Federated Search, a new Windows Explorer feature, feels incomplete, too. It uses the Open Search standard (find. pcworld.com/ 63700) to give Win 7’s search “connectors” for external sources. That capability allows you to search sites such as Flickr and You Tube from within Explorer. Pretty neat—except that Windows
7 doesn’t come with any of the connectors you’d need to add these sources, nor with any way of finding them. (They are available on the Web, though. Use a search engine to track them down.)

Source of Information : PC World November 2009

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